Pokey LaFarge

After crisscrossing the nation for the last half-decade looking for a home, Pokey LaFarge found himself in Mid-Coast Maine.  Upon arriving, the Illinois-born singer/songwriter/actor pursued a major life change, working 12-hour days on a local farm—a turn of events that catalyzed an extraordinary burst of creativity and redefined his sense of purpose as an artist.  On his new album Rhumba Country, LaFarge reveals his newly heightened devotion to making music that channels pure joy.  “There was a time when I glorified sadness because I lost sight of who I was, but now I understand that creating and expressing joy is my gift, and gifts are meant to be shared,” he says.  Reclaiming his voice, LaFarge has recorded his boldest album yet.  Rhumba Country was initially shaped from material that emerged while LaFarge was deep in work on the farm.  “I’d be pushing a plow or scattering seeds, and the songs would just come to me,” he recalls.  “It was tremendously inspirational and made me realize that apart from singing, farming is perhaps the oldest human art form.”  But as he moved forward with his songwriting, something felt undeniably amiss.  LaFarge then spoke with fellow Midwestern transplant Elliot Bergman (Wild Belle), who suggested he return to city life in Los Angeles for a season so that the two musicians could work together—a collaboration that soon brought the rhumba to LaFarge’s country.  As he immersed himself in the album’s creation, LaFarge began dreaming up a kaleidoscopic sound informed by his love of music from far-ranging eras and corners of the globe, including mambo, tropicália, rocksteady, and mid-century American rock-and-roll.  Co-produced along with Chris Seefried and Bergman and recorded in L.A., the resulting Rhumba Country is an invitation to come together to celebrate life and love.  “The songs that naturally come to me are upbeat and make you wanna dance or at least bop your head—they’re all very colorful,” says LaFarge. “I used to think of my music in dark blue, but now I see it in technicolor.”


Another Longworth-Anderson Series evening of great music, food, and drink!  Complimentary pre-concert reception features live local music, light bites from Ollie’s Trolley and N.Y.P.D. Pizza, and craft beer tastings from HighGrain Brewing Co.

Ravi Coltrane featuring Gadi Lehavi and Ele Howell

RAVI COLTRANE is a critically acclaimed Grammy nominated saxophonist, bandleader, and composer. In the course of a twenty plus year career, Mr. Coltrane has worked as a sideman to many, and recorded noteworthy albums for himself and others.

Ravi has released six albums as a leader. His albums include, “Moving Pictures,” “From The Round Box,” “Mad 6,” “In Flux,” “Blending Times,” and “Spirit Fiction.” He also has collaborated on various albums, including, “Seraphic Light” with Joe Lovano and David Liebman, “In Movement” with Jack DeJohnette and Matthew Garrison, and The Blue Note’s 70th Anniversary recording, “Mosaic: A Celebration of Blue Note.” Additional credits include performances as well as recordings with Elvin Jones, Terence Blanchard, Kenny Baron, Steve Coleman, McCoy Tyner, Jack DeJohnette, Matt Garrison, Jeff ‘Tain’ Watts, Geri Allen, Joanne Brackeem, The Blue Note 7, among others.

Born in Long Island, the second son of John Coltrane and Alice Coltrane, Ravi was named after Indian sitar legend Ravi Shankar. He was raised in Los Angeles where his family moved after his father’s death in 1967. His mother, Alice Coltrane, was a significant influence on Ravi and it was he who encouraged Alice to return to performance and the recording studio after a long absence. Subsequently, Ravi produced and played on Alice Coltrane’s powerful, ‘Translinear Light’, which was released in 2004.

Ravi lives in Brooklyn, NY and maintains a fast paced touring, recording, composing and performance schedule. He leads the effort to restore the John Coltrane Home in Dix Hills, Long Island www.thecoltranehome.org and presides over important reissues of his parent’s recordings.


Another Longworth-Anderson Series evening of great music, food, and drink!  Complimentary pre-concert reception features live local music, light bites from Ollie’s Trolley and N.Y.P.D. Pizza, and craft beer tastings from HighGrain Brewing Co.

Josh Ritter Works In Progress + Songs You Know

Renowned singer, songwriter, musician, artist, and best-selling author JOSH RITTER released his eleventh studio album, Spectral Lines, this past spring.

One of today’s most thoughtful and prolific voices, Ritter has been praised by NPR Music on 2019’s widely acclaimed Fever Breaks album:  “He remains a hydrant of ideas while embodying an endless capacity for empathy and indignation, often within a single song.”

In addition to his work as a musician, Ritter has released two novels to date:  2021’s The Great Glorious Goddamn of It All and 2011’s Bright’s Passage.  Released to critical attention, Stephen King wrote in The New York Times Book Review that Bright’s Passage “shines with a compressed lyricism that recalls Ray Bradbury in his prime…This is the work of a gifted novelist.”

This is a special “Works In Progress + Songs You Know” solo show.  Here’s a note from Ritter about the event:

“I’ve realized that a necessary part of working on records is finding the material that hangs together.  I write A LOT of songs, and not all of them play nicely with the others.  The most useful (and fun) way to find a song’s heart is to periodically play some shows where I’m able to get it all out there and see how I feel about them.  I’m really looking forward to these shows for the chance to get all these songs, and some that are old friends, out on the table for a good time.”

Another Longworth-Anderson Series evening of great music, food, and drink!  Complimentary pre-concert reception features live local music, light bites from Ollie’s Trolley and N.Y.P.D. Pizza, and craft beer tastings from HighGrain Brewing Co.

Rhiannon Giddens with Charly Lowry

Rhiannon Giddens has made a singular, iconic career out of stretching her brand of folk music, with its miles-deep historical roots and contemporary sensibilities, into just about every field imaginable.  A two-time GRAMMY Award-winning singer and instrumentalist, MacArthur “Genius” grant recipient, and composer of opera, ballet, and film, Giddens has centered her work around the mission of lifting up people whose contributions to American musical history have previously been overlooked or erased, and advocating for a more accurate understanding of the country’s musical origins through art.

As Pitchfork once said, “few artists are so fearless and so ravenous in their exploration”—a journey that has led to NPR naming her one of its 25 Most Influential Women Musicians of the 21st Century and to American Songwriter calling her “one of the most important musical minds currently walking the planet.”

For her highly anticipated third solo studio album, You’re The One, out August 18 on Nonesuch Records, she recruited producer Jack Splash (Kendrick Lamar, Solange, Alicia Keys, Valerie June, Tank and the Bangas) to help her bring this collection of songs that she’d written over the course of her career—her first album of all originals—to life at Criteria Recording Studios in Miami last November.  Together with a band composed of Giddens’s closest musical collaborators from the past decade alongside Miami-based musicians from Splash’s own Rolodex, and topped off with a horn section making an impressive ten- to twelve-person ensemble, they drew from the folk music that Giddens knows so deeply and its pop descendants.

You’re the One features electric and upright bass, conga, Cajun and piano accordions, guitars, a Western string section, and Miami horns, among other instruments.  “I hope that people just hear American music,” Giddens says.  “Blues, jazz, Cajun, country, gospel, and rock—it’s all there.  I like to be where it meets organically.”  The album is in line with her previous work, as she explains, because it’s yet another kind of project she’s never done before.  “I just wanted to expand my sound palette,” Giddens says. “I feel like I’ve done lots in the acoustic realm, and I certainly will again.  But these songs really needed a larger field.”

The album teems with Giddens’ breadth of, knowledge of, curiosity about, and experience with American vernacular music.  Though it might be filtered through a slightly more familiar blend of sounds, You’re The One never forsakes depth and groundedness for its listenability.  “They’re fun songs, and I wanted them to have as much of a chance as they could to reach people who might dig them but don’t know anything about, you know, what I do,” Giddens says.  “If they’re introduced to me through this record, they might go listen to other music I’ve made with a different set of ears.”


Charly Lowry, a musical powerhouse from Pembroke, NC, is proud to be an Indigenous woman belonging to the Lumbee/Tuscarora Tribes.  As an Artivist, she is compassionate as it pertains to raising awareness around issues that plague underrecognized and under-resourced communities.  Since her teenage years of studying the sounds of Motown, Pura Fé, Mariah Carey, Celine Dion, Whitney Houston, and southern gospel, Charly has established a career as a professional singer-songwriter (acoustic/electric guitar and Native American hand drum) who is known for her strong, passionate voice and versatility.  Over the past 2 decades Lowry earned a Top 32 spot on Season 3 of American Idol, received 2 kidney transplants, toured extensively and internationally (US, Europe, Canada) as lead singer and recording artist of the multi award-winning band, Dark Water Rising, collaborated with numerous artists, bands, television networks and productions, organizations including (UlalÍ, Rhiannon Giddens, New Mastersounds, Decolonizing Wealth, PBS, “RUMBLE: Indians Who Rocked the World”), and served as executive-director of “Peace in the Park”.  Currently spearheading her most recent project, “CHARLY”, Lowry’s life experiences are guiding her in a music career that is focused upon increasing Indigenous visibility on a global scale; revitalizing and preserving culture, whilst exploring genres of world, soul, country, folk, blues, rock, and roots music.

Among her community, Native women are traditionally barred from the hand-drum, singing behind the men’s drum and/or dancing instead.  Lowry defies that norm, following in the footsteps of her mentor Pura Fé; choosing to battle with her songs, storytelling, hand drum, and guitar to deliver performances that not only tell the plight of her people but all humankind that face oppression. Robeson County, her home, is one of the most diverse counties in the U.S., and Charly celebrates the diversity of those southern, rural swamps in all aspects of her life. While she may be familiar to some from her success as a semi-finalist on American Idol, she has maintained close ties to her Native American roots and culture.

She serves as a voice for her ancestors, as well as the youth of today, and remains committed to music that honors roots but lives vibrantly in the here and now.


Join us for another Longworth-Anderson Series evening of great music, food, and drink!  Complimentary pre-concert reception features live local music, light bites, and craft beer tastings from HighGrain Brewing Co.


As a touring artist, one of the biggest philosophical struggles I continue to face is the toll my work takes on our environment. We fly, ride on buses, in vans, and in cars, and you have to do the same to see us. Venues must provide food and other resources for us and our fans, and staff must get to the venues to make it all run – all of which take an environmental toll.

On this tour, we will do our best to minimize the footprint we leave behind and pay our carbon offsets, and we’re asking fans and venues to join us in making a positive impact.

Each ticket to every show on this tour will have $1 added to its price to be donated to effective sustainability programs supporting our environment and in turn, our local communities. In addition, we’re implementing the following efforts

  • Any tips you leave at the merch table will be added to our donation.
  • We’ve asked venues to forgo single-use plastic at our show, and do the same on our tour bus and in venues, as much as possible.
  • We encourage you to rideshare and take available public transportation to our shows.

At the end of the tour, we will share how much has been contributed and exactly the environmental projects they went toward. We know that, globally, a lot of work has to be done on the industrial scale, and in political realms, and that this may seem like a drop in the bucket. But enough drops, and the bucket overflows…